Tricks

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This is a fuel-injected version of "Gemini Twins" by Karl Fulves, which includes a simple, yet powerful convincer that makes the climax of the trick even more unbelievable.

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In what year was "Gemini Twins" first published? (Enter the password as a four-digit number.)

This semi-automatic card trick has a fun Faustian feel to it, making it the perfect piece to perform on Halloween.

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Which famous magician died on Halloween? Enter the password as one word (all lower-case).

“The Tantalizer” from The Royal Road to Card Magic is one of my favourite card tricks. This trick is a variation of a similar effect called “Impossible Card Location”, which was first published in Magic With Cards in 1974. The trick shares the same plot as the original in Royal Road, but involves three selections instead of just one.

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The original Tantalizer was published in The ***** **** to Card Magic. Enter the two missing words in this statement into the password field (remember keep everything lowercase and don't use that space bar).

This trick is an interesting application of a practice drill that Dai Vernon invented to perfect his Top Change technique.

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What was Harry Houdini’s younger brother called? Enter the password as one word (all lower-case).

This is my handling of Al Leech’s “A Hot Card Trick”, also known as the “Chicago Opener” or “Red Hot Mama”. In this version of the trick, the backs of two selected cards change colour. Both cards can be examined after they change, and I’ve also included a natural way to reset the effect in front of an audience.

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What was the profession of amateur magician Al Leech? The password is a single word (all lower-case).

This trick is based on Jim Steranko’s “Voodoo Card” trick, published in his book Steranko on Cards. The force used in the trick is a no-gaff variation of the Christ Force (also known as the 203rd Force), which was originated by Henry Christ.

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Magician Jim Steranko is also famous in the world of comic books for illustrating which popular Marvel character? Enter the password as one word (all lower-case).

This is my handling of Bill Elliott’s “3 Card Monkey Business”. I’ve also incorporated some ideas from Jim Temple’s “Color Monte”.

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Who illustrated the pages of Ibidem? Enter the password as one word (all lower-case).

This is a fun packet trick based on “The Last Trick of Dr. Jacob Daley”, which was first published in the Dai Vernon Book of Magic as a tribute to the late Doctor.

I’ve developed the presentation to expand on the “chase the Ace” theme of the original, and added a second phase to make the trick a little longer. These changes are intended to fix some of the inherent weaknesses present in the original trick.

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Which book can Daley's routine "The Cavorting Aces" be found in? Enter the password as one word (all lower-case).